The Christian Worldview (3): Epistemology (a)

Books have been written on what the Bible says about epistemology, I cannot hope in a few pages to provide a comprehensive epistemology. The best book in this regard, I believe, is John Frame’s The Doctrine of the Knowledge of God: I will here highlight a few salient points of a biblical epistemology based on … Continue reading The Christian Worldview (3): Epistemology (a)

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The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (c)

Within the Christian metaphysic, humanity has a unique role in the created order as the representatives of the creator God in the created world: we were to rule as His representatives. The biblical language for this is the image of God. Yet in the fall, all humanity is under a curse: each person is sinful … Continue reading The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (c)

The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (b)

The next step of the biblical story is the fall. We are told that, because of the Fall, all things have been subject to decay—that God’s good creation is now subject to death. Humanity especially is subject to sin—is by default living under the realm of Satan and devoted to rebellion against God. This is the … Continue reading The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (b)

The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (a)

The Bible begins with creation; this is a good place for us to start to delineate the Biblical Worldview. From the Bible’s view of creation we are given the heart of the Biblical worldview, the creator-creature distinction. There are two fundamental realities according to the Bible, God and His creation. Everything we can consider is … Continue reading The Christian Worldview (2): Metaphysics (a)

The Christian Worldview (1): Introduction

When we speak of the Christian Worldview, we refer to the ideal worldview—the true worldview, against which each of our individual worldviews is compared. As Christians, each of us has a Christian worldview which bears a close resemblance to but does not equal the Christian worldview. The Christian worldview, then, is the worldview God has … Continue reading The Christian Worldview (1): Introduction

Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 3: Sufficiency

Throughout Luther’s attacks on Roman doctrine, he makes his primary appeals to Scripture, enlisting the Father’s support only to show his ideas were not novel. In stark contrast, as exemplified by the Papal Bulls, his opponents considered the Fathers and Councils to be additional sources for doctrine alongside the authoritative Scriptures. Of the errors condemned … Continue reading Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 3: Sufficiency

Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 2: Clarity

In Luther’s eyes, his opponents believed Scripture to be obscure and unclear (Luther 1997b, 255): the Papists, writes Luther, “adhere to [the interpretation of the Fathers] and believe that in these interpretations they possess something that no one could reject, and claim again and again in order to keep us away from the pure Word … Continue reading Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 2: Clarity

Luther Against the Neo-Orthodox on Inerrancy

Many modern interpreters debate Luther’s doctrine of inerrancy: they argue that Luther held a position later associated with Neo-orthodoxy (e.g., Karl Barth). Luther, it is said, did not hold to a view of verbal-plenary inspiration nor of an inerrant text. For Luther, it is claimed, the form of Scripture was not inerrant and authoritative: inerrancy … Continue reading Luther Against the Neo-Orthodox on Inerrancy

Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 1 – Inerrancy and Authority

In the controversy that followed the posting of Luther’s 95 theses in 1517, it is readily apparent Luther and his opponents are vast distances from one another on the question of interpretive authority. Luther’s opponents agreed with him on the infallibility or inerrancy of Scripture (the nature of being free from error) and its authority, … Continue reading Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 1 – Inerrancy and Authority

A Critical Review of Dempster’s Dominion and Dynasty

Dempster’s attempt to read the whole Bible literarily fails to consider what the OT is and the contribution its nature and structure make to the question of the OT’s unity. By seeking the unity of the OT in a narrative plot unpacking the themes of dominion and dynasty, Dempster forces the OT into a procrustean … Continue reading A Critical Review of Dempster’s Dominion and Dynasty