Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 2: Clarity

In Luther’s eyes, his opponents believed Scripture to be obscure and unclear (Luther 1997b, 255): the Papists, writes Luther, “adhere to [the interpretation of the Fathers] and believe that in these interpretations they possess something that no one could reject, and claim again and again in order to keep us away from the pure Word … Continue reading Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 2: Clarity

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Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 1 – Inerrancy and Authority

In the controversy that followed the posting of Luther’s 95 theses in 1517, it is readily apparent Luther and his opponents are vast distances from one another on the question of interpretive authority. Luther’s opponents agreed with him on the infallibility or inerrancy of Scripture (the nature of being free from error) and its authority, … Continue reading Luther’s Sola Scriptura Part 1 – Inerrancy and Authority

Limiting Concepts and Biblical Logic – Part 1

What do we do when our logic seems to befool us? when we run the numbers, check the math, yet we are left with unresolved contradictions? In philosophy and biblical studies, this comes up a lot: the perennial response to the doctrine of the Trinity is the accusation of bad math—how can God be both … Continue reading Limiting Concepts and Biblical Logic – Part 1

Some Thoughts on Philip Schaff’s The Principle of Protestantism

In part one of his book the Principle of Protestantism, Philip Schaff sketches the two-sided (material and formal) principle he sees to be the essential positive element of the Reformation; that is, the progressive element the Reformation contributed to the evolution of the Catholic Church. The second part addresses the relation of this principle to … Continue reading Some Thoughts on Philip Schaff’s The Principle of Protestantism

Some Thoughts on Braaten and Jenson, The Catholicity of the Reformation

In the section Structures of Authority in his essay, The Problem of Authority in the Church, Carl E. Braaten argues that the Reformation was catholic in the way it viewed the relationship between Scripture and the church. Braaten argues beforehand that the church needs a way to identify and denounce heresy; to do so there … Continue reading Some Thoughts on Braaten and Jenson, The Catholicity of the Reformation

The Co-Inherence of Authority, Inerrancy and Trustworthiness

[This accompanies this post] Wait a second, you may be thinking, you are fallaciously connecting ideas that are not necessarily connected: is authority really so connected to inerrancy? Yet, are they not? Let us ask ourselves, what do we mean when we call Scripture ‘authoritative’? We are affirming, with all of the writers of Scripture … Continue reading The Co-Inherence of Authority, Inerrancy and Trustworthiness

Unless You Believed in Vain

In 1 Corinthians 15, Paul addresses false teaching in the Corinthian church and challenges the church on their doubt concerning the resurrection: “if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins” (15:17). Yet, those who proffer this passage to substantiate the necessity of history for faith fail … Continue reading Unless You Believed in Vain

In God whose Word I Praise, In God I Trust

68 Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life, 69 and we have believed, and have come to know, that you are the Holy One of God. (John 6:68-69)   When many disciples had abandoned Jesus, offended by his words, Peter and the apostles response was to hold … Continue reading In God whose Word I Praise, In God I Trust

A Short and Selected Bibliography of Reformed and Evangelical Theology (tailored a bit for Regent College)

For readings from the best of the Reformed and Evangelical traditions, there are lots to explore. These traditions emphasize the Bible and not analogy or experience as the primary source of theology. Below is a very short and quite selective bibliography of reformed and evangelical theology and biblical studies from the last 100 or so … Continue reading A Short and Selected Bibliography of Reformed and Evangelical Theology (tailored a bit for Regent College)

Reflections on Scripture

A few years ago, I came across an article from a pastor in the States decrying evangelical Christians as bibliolaters, that is, he suggested that our talk of “inerrancy” and “authority” turned us away from God to the writings of man. For him, it was okay to speak of encountering God in the Bible, but … Continue reading Reflections on Scripture